World Prizes in Philosophy: The Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy

Kyoto Prize Medal, Inamori Foundation, Kyoto, Japan Click here for the official webpage. In this fourth feature of our #Prizes in Philosophy series, we take a brief look at the eminent Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy — a USD 530 000 (EUR 413 000 or 50 million yen) prize granted to a living person who has made “outstanding contributions to the progress of science, the advancement of civilization, and the enrichment and elevation of the human spirit”. The prize is divided by four fields awarded in alternating cycles, that include (i) music, (ii) arts (painting,… Read More

Shirin Neshat on “From Photography to Cinema”

March 19th 2013, University of California, Berkeley Click here for the video of the lecture. In this entry, we review once more one of the most #PersonallyInspiring figures we have covered here at Integrating Horizons: the Iranian born artist and filmmaker Shirin Neshat. In the following video of the 2013 Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, Regent’s Lecturer Series, Shirin reflects on her own “untraditional” professional journey and how it has contradicted the many structured approaches she had received at U.C. Berkeley. In her lecture, she underscored the importance of her time away from being… Read More

World #Prizes in Philosophy Series: The Templeton Prize

Click here for the link to the official webpage. In this third feature of the #Prizes in Philosophy Series, we take a look at the Templeton Prize — a USD 1 000 000 (£1,100,000 Sterling) prize granted to a living person for exceptional contributions in “affirming life’s spiritual dimension, whether through insight, discovery, or practical works”. The prize is open to any one living person whose works have indirectly or directly explored “the many and diverse manifestation of the Divine”. According to the direction of renowned founder and philanthropist Sir John Templeton,… Read More

Philosophical Matters: The Meaning of “Being at Home” Part 2

I briefly mentioned in a previous written entry on Integrating Horizons that my own private philosophical works have been spent thinking about the meaning of what it is “to be at home”. I was interested in the different ways we currently speak of our sense of being at home, how each affects the normative significance it has in terms of how things matter to me and how this matters to institutions and governments, indeed for thinking not only about major social global issues of the past, the present, and future, but also, perhaps more or less philosophically,… Read More